The Brad Kaminsky Foundation
In Loving Memory of..
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Brenda  BB Huff, Mim O'Neill, Richard Alan Brownmiller, Jim Ingman, Michael Bloomberg and all our Angels

 
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Information about Brain Tumors

Disclaimer: This information is for educational purposes only. We cannot assume responsibility for its accuracy. Please, obtain information about your condition from your Doctor. The Brad Kaminsky Foundation does not endorse any service, treatment, institution or physician

Information About The Brain / Possible Causes / Types Of Brain Tumors / Symptoms / Diagnostic Tools
Treatments / Clinical Trials / Follow Up Care / Medical Definitions

The Brain

Together, the brain and spinal cord form the central nervous system. This complex system is part of everything we do. It controls the things we choose to do--like walk and talk--and the things our body does automatically--like breathe and digest food. The central nervous system is also involved with our senses--seeing, hearing, touching, tasting, and smelling--as well as our emotions, thoughts, and memory.

The brain is a soft, spongy mass of nerve cells and supportive tissue. It has three major parts: the cerebrum, the cerebellum, and the brain stem. The parts work together, but each has special functions. The cerebrum, the largest part of the brain, fills most of the upper skull. It has two halves called the left and right cerebral hemispheres. The cerebrum uses information from our senses to tell us what is going on around us and tells our body how to respond. The right hemisphere controls the muscles on the left side of the body, and the left hemisphere controls the muscles on the right side of the body. This part of the brain also controls speech and emotions as well as reading, thinking, and learning. The cerebellum, under the cerebrum at the back of the brain, controls balance and complex actions like walking and talking. The brain stem connects the brain with the spinal cord. It controls hunger and thirst and some of the most basic body functions, such as body temperature, blood pressure, and breathing. The brain is protected by the bones of the skull and by a covering of three thin membranes called meninges. The brain is also cushioned and protected by cerebrospinal fluid. This watery fluid is produced by special cells in the four hollow spaces in the brain, called ventricles. It flows through the ventricles and in spaces between the meninges.

Cerebrospinal fluid also brings nutrients from the blood to the brain and removes waste products from the brain. The spinal cord is made up of bundles of nerve fibers. It runs down from the brain through a canal in the center of the bones of the spine. These bones protect the spinal cord. Like the brain, the spinal cord is covered by the meninges and cushioned by cerebrospinal fluid. Spinal nerves connect the brain with the nerves in most parts of the body. Other nerves go directly from the brain to the eyes, ears, and other parts of the head. This network of nerves carries messages back and forth between the brain and the rest of the body. The body is made up of many types of cells. Each type of cell has special functions. Most cells in the body grow and then divide in an orderly way to form new cells as they are needed to keep the body healthy and working properly. When cells lose the ability to control their growth, they divide too often and without any order.

The extra cells form a mass of tissue called a tumor. Tumors are benign or malignant. Benign brain tumors do not contain cancer cells. Usually these tumors can be removed, and they are not likely to recur. Benign brain tumors have clear borders. Although they do not invade nearby tissue, they can press on sensitive areas of the brain and cause symptoms. Malignant brain tumors contain cancer cells. They interfere with vital functions and are life threatening. Malignant brain tumors are likely to grow rapidly and crowd or invade the tissue around them. Like a plant, these tumors may put out "roots" that grow into healthy brain tissue. If a malignant tumor remains compact and does not have roots, it is said to be encapsulated. When an otherwise benign tumor is located in a vital area of the brain and interferes with vital functions, it may be considered malignant (even though it contains no cancer cells). Doctors refer to some brain tumors by grade--from low grade (grade I) to high grade (grade IV). The grade of a tumor refers to the way the cells look under a microscope. Cells from higher grade tumors are more abnormal looking and generally grow faster than cells from lower grade tumors; higher grade tumors are more malignant than lower grade tumors.

 

 

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