The Brad Kaminsky Foundation is Dedicated to Raising Awareness and Funds for
Childhood & Adult Brain Tumor and Cancer Research.
 

The Brad Kaminsky Foundation
In Loving Memory of..
Brad Kaminsky, Lisa Gibson, Bob Carter, Jr., Tony Leonard, Susanne McMillan, Dan McNally, Andy Lewis, William Keyser, Diane Wyatt, Gregory Weiss, James McKenzie, Geoff Cornman, Brian Bedell, Joseph Gray, Mary Haller, Jonathan Hicks, Capt. John Flynn, Sherry Brinton, Kyle Kerpan, Kyle Snyder, James Meyers, Josie Chiang, Stefan, Karen S., Jacqueline V. Offutt, Lauren Fitzgerald, Judy Hahn, Christine Donahue, Larry Burns, Anne Glynn, Lindsay Warren, Joe Lieb, Mike Gianinni, Bill Waggener, Melanie Knight-Teaster, Judi Spivack, Niki Perry, William Schopf, Nancy Coyle, Karen Stevens, Jose Andrade, Jose Rodriguez,
Brenda  BB Huff, Mim O'Neill, Richard Alan Brownmiller, Jim Ingman, Michael Bloomberg and all our Angels

 
BRAD KAMINSKY FOUNDATION
 

   

 

Information about Brain Tumors

Disclaimer: This information is for educational purposes only. We cannot assume responsibility for its accuracy. Please, obtain information about your condition from your Doctor. The Brad Kaminsky Foundation does not endorse any service, treatment, institution or physician

Information About The Brain / Possible Causes / Types Of Brain Tumors / Symptoms / Diagnostic Tools
Treatments / Clinical Trials / Follow Up Care / Medical Definitions

Diagnostic tools

To find the cause of a person's symptoms, the doctor asks about the patient's personal and family medical history and performs a complete physical examination. In addition to checking general signs of health, the doctor does a neurologic exam. This includes checks for alertness, muscle strength, coordination, reflexes, and response to pain. The doctor also examines the eyes to look for swelling caused by a tumor pressing on the nerve that connects the eye and the brain. Depending on the results of the physical and neurologic examinations, the doctor may request one or both of the following: A CT (or CAT) scan is a series of detailed pictures of the brain. The pictures are created by a computer linked to an x-ray machine. In some cases, a special dye is injected into a vein before the scan. The dye helps to show differences in the tissues of the brain. MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) gives pictures of the brain, using a powerful magnet linked to a computer. MRI is especially useful in diagnosing brain tumors because it can "see" through the bones of the skull to the tissue underneath. A special dye may be used to enhance the likelihood of detecting a brain tumor.

The doctor may also request other tests such as: A skull x-ray can show changes in the bones of the skull caused by a tumor. It can also show calcium deposits, which are present in some types of brain tumors. A brain scan reveals areas of abnormal growth in the brain and records them on special film. A small amount of a radioactive material is injected into a vein. This dye is absorbed by the tumor, and the growth shows up on the film. (The radiation leaves the body within 6 hours and is not dangerous.) An angiogram, or arteriogram, is a series of x-rays taken after a special dye is injected into an artery (usually in the area where the abdomen joins the top of the leg). The dye, which flows through the blood vessels of the brain, can be seen on the x-rays. These x-rays can show the tumor and blood vessels that lead to it. A myelogram is an x-ray of the spine. A special dye is injected into the cerebrospinal fluid in the spine, and the patient is tilted to allow the dye to mix with the fluid. This test may be done when the doctor suspects a tumor in the spinal cord.

 

 

The Brad Kaminsky Foundation - 20227 Catlett Place - Ashburn, VA 20147 - (703) 729-9897 - E-mail Lisa@tbkf.org